Black Veins

Obtained by stretching the impasto first by hand and then with CNC machining, Ruts alternates between flat portions, reminiscent of stone, to rectangular sections to create a succession with a solid and fortunate rhythm. The “cadence” of its grooves can be more or less dense, continuous or interrupted, but in each of its versions and in all the different colors, Ruts reveals, thanks to the intervention of the machine, the material uniqueness of paper pulp. They are indeed hard, mechanized cuts that speak of the very fiber of the paper as it pushes toward new dynamic and formal borders.

Grey Veins

Obtained by stretching the impasto first by hand and then with CNC machining, Ruts alternates between flat portions, reminiscent of stone, to rectangular sections to create a succession with a solid and fortunate rhythm. The “cadence” of its grooves can be more or less dense, continuous or interrupted, but in each of its versions and in all the different colors, Ruts reveals, thanks to the intervention of the machine, the material uniqueness of paper pulp. They are indeed hard, mechanized cuts that speak of the very fiber of the paper as it pushes toward new dynamic and formal borders.

Blue Veins

Obtained by stretching the impasto first by hand and then with CNC machining, Ruts alternates between flat portions, reminiscent of stone, to rectangular sections to create a succession with a solid and fortunate rhythm. The “cadence” of its grooves can be more or less dense, continuous or interrupted, but in each of its versions and in all the different colors, Ruts reveals, thanks to the intervention of the machine, the material uniqueness of paper pulp. They are indeed hard, mechanized cuts that speak of the very fiber of the paper as it pushes toward new dynamic and formal borders.

Ample Black

Inspired by the ancient technique of intarsia, the surfaces of Inlay exploit the physical qualities of paper pulp allowing the cellulose paste components added to the pigments or left in natural tonalities to smoothly join each other during the pressing and assemblage. This results in surfaces with spotted effects, with defined shapes, even within the random movements of the play of colors. in the visual force of its panels or in the entertaining puzzle of its mosaics, it is equally adapted to simple re-covering projects as it is to projects that are designed to make spaces utterly unique.

Flow

Inspired by the ancient technique of intarsia, the surfaces of Inlay exploit the physical qualities of paper pulp allowing the cellulose paste components added to the pigments or left in natural tonalities to smoothly join each other during the pressing and assemblage. This results in surfaces with spotted effects, with defined shapes, even within the random movements of the play of colors. in the visual force of its panels or in the entertaining puzzle of its mosaics, it is equally adapted to simple re-covering projects as it is to projects that are designed to make spaces utterly unique.

Ample

Inspired by the ancient technique of intarsia, the surfaces of Inlay exploit the physical qualities of paper pulp allowing the cellulose paste components added to the pigments or left in natural tonalities to smoothly join each other during the pressing and assemblage. This results in surfaces with spotted effects, with defined shapes, even within the random movements of the play of colors. in the visual force of its panels or in the entertaining puzzle of its mosaics, it is equally adapted to simple re-covering projects as it is to projects that are designed to make spaces utterly unique.